Tak's Travel Tips for VisitingAruba.....

You have stumbled upon my notes for visiting Aruba. These informational nuggets or tips for visiting Aruba are obtained from a variety of sources including my first hand observations, personal conversations, magazines, newspapers, websites, books and so forth. The point of this site is for me to keep notes on places I want to visit or have visited.

Best Time to Visit Aruba

Short Answer: November through August

Longer Answer: Aruba benefits from a constant breeze due to its location in the path of the trade winds. It also benefits from lying outside the typical hurricane belt. What this means is you get the good wind and avoid the steroid wind. However, in September and October, these trade winds die out and so the hot weather (and bugs) are more noticeable. As such, September and October are the worst (weather-wise) and one of the best cost-wise. Funny how that works.

As November turns into the holidays and winter, Aruba pricing jacks up. The weather is great at this time of year but so are the hotel income streams. As the cold U.S. & European winters disappear, the crowds in Aruba lessen. As such, April through August should give you more bang for the buck although the temperatures will also be climbing (offset, of course, by those nice trade winds).

Miscellaneous Travel Tips for Aruba

So many people just hang out in their resort or hotel somewhere on the western part of Aruba and never venture out. If you like adventure, rent a car and drive out to the north and western corners. There is some cool hiking and interesting desert and water coloration out there. Further, it’s pretty peaceful because…everyone is hanging out in their resort or hotel on the western part of the island.

Secondly, one of the nice things about Aruba is that they have palapas, or chickies or tiki-huts (whatever you want to call them) on some of the beaches. People don’t realize but the beach is public property and the palapas, built on public property, can be used by anyone. It’s a long running issue between commercial interests (e.g. hotels, etc) and non-commercial interest (e.g. citizens, tourists, etc.). Obviously the commercial interests try to act like they own the beach.

In any case, if you find a free palapas, you can park under there and enjoy the nice shade it brings without the hassle of hauling umbrellas and all that jazz. Some people want to get rid of them and replaces them with umbrellas but I find the palapas a really nice feature of the Aruba beach experience.

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Tak

New York, NY
Internationally-published photographer with a passion for creative food, fine products, unique cultures and underground music. Twitter / Instagram / Email

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November 2016